Use the future to build the present
Brain Monitoring
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1Quantum Revolution& Advanced AI2HumanAugmentation3Eco-Regeneration& Geo-Engineering4Science& Diplomacy1.11.21.31.42.12.22.32.43.13.23.33.43.54.14.24.34.44.5HIGHEST ANTICIPATIONPOTENTIALAdvancedArtificial IntelligenceQuantumTechnologiesBrain-inspiredComputingBiologicalComputingCognitiveEnhancementHuman Applications of Genetic EngineeringRadical HealthExtensionConsciousnessAugmentation DecarbonisationWorldSimulationFuture FoodSystemsSpaceResourcesOceanStewardshipComplex Systems forSocial EnhancementScience-basedDiplomacyInnovationsin EducationSustainableEconomicsCollaborativeScience Diplomacy
1Quantum Revolution& Advanced AI2HumanAugmentation3Eco-Regeneration& Geo-Engineering4Science& Diplomacy1.11.21.31.42.12.22.32.43.13.23.33.43.54.14.24.34.44.5HIGHEST ANTICIPATIONPOTENTIALAdvancedArtificial IntelligenceQuantumTechnologiesBrain-inspiredComputingBiologicalComputingCognitiveEnhancementHuman Applications of Genetic EngineeringRadical HealthExtensionConsciousnessAugmentation DecarbonisationWorldSimulationFuture FoodSystemsSpaceResourcesOceanStewardshipComplex Systems forSocial EnhancementScience-basedDiplomacyInnovationsin EducationSustainableEconomicsCollaborativeScience Diplomacy

Sub-Field:

2.1.1Brain Monitoring

To successfully manipulate cognitive processes, the first step is to read and interpret the brain's signals. Only when we understand how the brain processes and represents information can we hope to alter that language when it goes wrong or to improve upon its baseline functioning. A wide range of technologies, from deeply invasive brain implants to non-invasive wearables, are now in various stages of sophistication.5 Some are beginning to emerge into the clinic and — as with many medical interventions that start as therapy — into the general population. Major invasive techniques are deep brain stimulation (DBS), cortical stimulation and opto- and chemogenetics, which are used mostly in animal research.
Non-invasive techniques to record brain activity are electroencephalography (EEG), magnetoencephalography (MEG), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).6 Each class of technology has benefits and trade-offs; invasive technology yields higher resolution data yet non-invasive is more convenient and will get us more generalisable data in the general population.7

Future Horizons:

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5-yearhorizon

First commercial non-invasive neuromodulation devices validated

Non-invasive brain recording devices improves enough to be wearable and provide a signal-to-noise ratio comparable to MEG and fMRI, which currently require large and costly infrastructure. Consequently, the availability and use of such devices for non-medical purposes will likely increase.

10-yearhorizon

Open brain data stimulates research

Increased data sharing and storage accelerates basic research that is currently hindered by national ethical and privacy laws, allowing for faster selection from the cognitive enhancement methods that are being evaluated.

25-yearhorizon

Miniaturisation makes invasive devices less invasive but more intrusive

Optogenetics and gene therapy advance to the point where advanced electrical recording and stimulation devices, and optogenetic technologies, can be implanted into the brain and operated wirelessly from outside the skull to monitor brain activity at high resolution. Cheap, portable non-invasive imaging technologies are used in a greater variety of real-world situations, allowing for example the legal system to distinguish between real memories, false memories, and lies in the courtroom in real-time.

Brain Monitoring - Anticipation Scores

How the experts see this field in terms of the expected time to maturity, transformational effect across science and industries, current state of awareness among stakeholders and its possible impact on people, society and the planet. See methodology for more information.

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