Advances in Science Diplomacy
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Advances in Science Diplomacy
Use the future to build the present
Advances in Science Diplomacy
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5.5SyntheticBiology5.4Science ofthe Originsof Life5.3FutureEconomics5.2Future ofEducation5.1ComplexSystemsScience4.4Democracy-affirming Technologies4.1Science-basedDiplomacy4.2Advances inScience Diplomacy4.3Digital Technologiesand Conflict3.7InfectiousDiseases3.6Solar RadiationModification3.5OceanStewardship3.4SpaceResources3.3Future FoodSystems3.2WorldSimulation3.1Decarbonisation2.6FutureTherapeutics2.5Organoids2.4ConsciousnessAugmentation2.3RadicalHealthExtension2.2HumanApplicationsof GeneticEngineering2.1CognitiveEnhancement1.6CollectiveIntelligence1.5AugmentedReality1.4BiologicalComputing1.3Brain-inspiredComputing1.2QuantumTechnologies1.1AdvancedAIHIGHEST ANTICIPATIONPOTENTIAL
5.5SyntheticBiology5.4Science ofthe Originsof Life5.3FutureEconomics5.2Future ofEducation5.1ComplexSystemsScience4.4Democracy-affirming Technologies4.1Science-basedDiplomacy4.2Advances inScience Diplomacy4.3Digital Technologiesand Conflict3.7InfectiousDiseases3.6Solar RadiationModification3.5OceanStewardship3.4SpaceResources3.3Future FoodSystems3.2WorldSimulation3.1Decarbonisation2.6FutureTherapeutics2.5Organoids2.4ConsciousnessAugmentation2.3RadicalHealthExtension2.2HumanApplicationsof GeneticEngineering2.1CognitiveEnhancement1.6CollectiveIntelligence1.5AugmentedReality1.4BiologicalComputing1.3Brain-inspiredComputing1.2QuantumTechnologies1.1AdvancedAIHIGHEST ANTICIPATIONPOTENTIAL

Emerging Topic:

4.2Advances in Science Diplomacy

    Associated Sub-Fields

    The products of science are increasingly celebrated as drivers of global health, sustainable development and wealth creation. Science and technology are also sources of tension and competition between nations or regions. The COVID-19 crisis in particular has highlighted the role of science on the international stage, how it rapidly advanced novel vaccine technologies, and how these vaccines became a crucial part of the currency of international negotiations, diplomacy and geopolitics. The emerging discipline of science diplomacy seeks to establish an evidence-based, anticipatory foundation for this kind of endeavour.

    Show advancements in the past year

    This foundation will support and empower the increasingly diverse set of stakeholders who practice science diplomacy, though there are numerous challenges ahead. One issue is how to train and incorporate these actors at state and non-state levels — these actors will come from government, academia, global companies, grass roots and non-governmental organisations, and so on. These actors are currently in siloed communities that have little reason or incentives to interact, and often speak different “languages” in the sense of the jargon and concepts they rely on. A challenge will be to find ways to bring them together to find a common “worldview” and to train individuals and institutions with the technical multilingualism they need to communicate effectively across boundaries. “Big science” projects are becoming part of this diplomatic landscape, requiring long-term technical and diplomatic engagement among a broad group of stakeholders. These diverse groups must also find ways to manage traditional and emerging global commons fairly and effectively.

    Selection of GESDA Best Reads and further key reports

    Science diplomacy is a relatively new discipline with a broad and multidisciplinary skill set. In 2008, the American Association for the Advancement of Science established a Center for Science Diplomacy as a focal point for discussion, publication and training in this field.1 In 2010, AAAS and the UK’s Royal Society published the report “New Frontiers in Science Diplomacy”, which proposed the first conceptual framework for science diplomacy.2 The European Union Science Diplomacy Alliance, established in 2021, brings together the members of several research projects on science diplomacy.3 In 2018, S4D4C published a useful review of work and approaches in this area,4 and Timothy Legrande and Diane Stone published “Science diplomacy and transnational governance impact”, which presents a research agenda for influencing politics and international studies with science.5

    Emerging Topic:

    Anticipation Potential

    Advances in Science Diplomacy

    Sub-Fields:

    Multistakeholder Technology Diplomacy
    Integrating Non-State Actors
    Diplomacy for Big Science
    Managing the Global Commons
    The importance of diplomacy in science and vice versa is becoming increasingly accepted. Nowhere is this more apparent than in our efforts to better manage our global commons, which was judged to have by far the highest potential for impact of the four topics investigated. Breakthroughs in this area are still some way off, however, with respondents predicting that maturity won't be achieved for another 14 years. Getting there will be a long-term project and will be impossible to achieve without breakthroughs in multi-stakeholder diplomacy, which will require considerably more attention going forward.

    GESDA Best Reads and Key Resources

    Article

    Quantitative Foresighting as a Means of Improving Anticipatory Scientific Capacity and Strategic Planning

    Published:

    8th Aug 2021
    In a rapidly changing world, scientists and research institutions need to plan for the infrastructure, skills, and policy engagement that will help society navigate social-ecological challenges. Foresighting draws on approaches used in strategic and long-range (>10 years) planning and participatory futures studies. Here, we describe a new quantitative approach to develop and rank 14 foresight scenarios across a range of general and marine-relevant science domains. Indicators for each foresight were used to assess the time-specific probability of each scenario being realized. Assessments by scientists in 2 consecutive years showed foresight scoring consistency and revealed surprises. Despite high variation among scientists in scoring the year that each indicator would occur, there was overall consistency across the foresights between years. We show that foresighting can be quantitative and that individual performance and changes in likelihood can be evaluated. This approach can motivate and guide strategic planning and investment decisions by scientific institutions in response to different anticipated futures and build skills in futures thinking.