Use the future to build the present
Innovations in Education
Comment
Stakeholder Type
,
1Quantum Revolution& Advanced AI2HumanAugmentation3Eco-Regeneration& Geo-Engineering4Science& Diplomacy1.11.21.31.42.12.22.32.43.13.23.33.43.54.14.24.34.44.5HIGHEST ANTICIPATIONPOTENTIALAdvancedArtificial IntelligenceQuantumTechnologiesBrain-inspiredComputingBiologicalComputingCognitiveEnhancementHuman Applications of Genetic EngineeringRadical HealthExtensionConsciousnessAugmentation DecarbonisationWorldSimulationFuture FoodSystemsSpaceResourcesOceanStewardshipComplex Systems forSocial EnhancementScience-basedDiplomacyInnovationsin EducationSustainableEconomicsCollaborativeScience Diplomacy
1Quantum Revolution& Advanced AI2HumanAugmentation3Eco-Regeneration& Geo-Engineering4Science& Diplomacy1.11.21.31.42.12.22.32.43.13.23.33.43.54.14.24.34.44.5HIGHEST ANTICIPATIONPOTENTIALAdvancedArtificial IntelligenceQuantumTechnologiesBrain-inspiredComputingBiologicalComputingCognitiveEnhancementHuman Applications of Genetic EngineeringRadical HealthExtensionConsciousnessAugmentation DecarbonisationWorldSimulationFuture FoodSystemsSpaceResourcesOceanStewardshipComplex Systems forSocial EnhancementScience-basedDiplomacyInnovationsin EducationSustainableEconomicsCollaborativeScience Diplomacy

Emerging Topic:

4.3Innovations in Education

Associated Sub-Fields

The importance of education is hard to overstate. The UN’s fourth Sustainable Development Goal is to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all. Education is a vital part of creating a sustainable world populated by healthy, collaborative, creative people who are able to solve problems, contribute to economic success and enjoy a high quality of life.

Over the last few decades, science and technology have provided new sets of tools that can help us innovate in education to create a better educated human population. Many of these tools involve innovations such as digitised sensors, artificial intelligence and wearable computing components. However, just having access to these technologies is not enough: they have to be used in smart, thoughtful ways, and with an eye towards equity, if we are to create a better educated world.

Advances in understanding the science of learning are helping here. Insights into the neural processes of learning, the dynamics and cognitive aspects of teaching, and the importance of social interaction in learning are proving useful when creating learning contexts, curricula and tools for developing learners’ potential.

Selection of GESDA best reads and further key reports 

In recent years there have been numerous efforts to track the potential of technology and other tools to transform teaching and learning. In 2017, for instance, the US National Bureau of Economic Research put together a working paper, “Education Technology: An Evidence-Based Review”, synthesising and discussing the evidence of effectiveness gathered in developing and developed countries.1 “Innovation in education: what works, what doesn’t, and what to do about it?” focusses on the US experience and delivers a number of interesting conclusions, particularly about the need for scalable innovation.2 EdTech Hub is a globally focused evidence library and tools database that aims to assist decision-making regarding educational technology.3

Making improvements to our educational systems is not a novel idea, but major innovation appears to be imminent. Respondents expect breakthroughs in all of the areas investigated within the decade, which suggests the window for anticipation is already narrowing. The one possible outlier is educational sensing, which is expected to reach maturity last and currently has relatively low awareness. Given the potential privacy issues raised by widespread surveillance in the classroom this is likely to require more work than the other topics to map out the potential ramifications and to find solutions to any problems uncovered.

GESDA Best Reads and Key Resources