Use the future to build the present
Multistakeholder Technology Diplomacy
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1Quantum Revolution& Advanced AI2HumanAugmentation3Eco-Regeneration& Geo-Engineering4Science& Diplomacy1.11.21.31.42.12.22.32.43.13.23.33.43.54.14.24.34.44.5HIGHEST ANTICIPATIONPOTENTIALAdvancedArtificial IntelligenceQuantumTechnologiesBrain-inspiredComputingBiologicalComputingCognitiveEnhancementHuman Applications of Genetic EngineeringRadical HealthExtensionConsciousnessAugmentation DecarbonisationWorldSimulationFuture FoodSystemsSpaceResourcesOceanStewardshipComplex Systems forSocial EnhancementScience-basedDiplomacyInnovationsin EducationSustainableEconomicsCollaborativeScience Diplomacy
1Quantum Revolution& Advanced AI2HumanAugmentation3Eco-Regeneration& Geo-Engineering4Science& Diplomacy1.11.21.31.42.12.22.32.43.13.23.33.43.54.14.24.34.44.5HIGHEST ANTICIPATIONPOTENTIALAdvancedArtificial IntelligenceQuantumTechnologiesBrain-inspiredComputingBiologicalComputingCognitiveEnhancementHuman Applications of Genetic EngineeringRadical HealthExtensionConsciousnessAugmentation DecarbonisationWorldSimulationFuture FoodSystemsSpaceResourcesOceanStewardshipComplex Systems forSocial EnhancementScience-basedDiplomacyInnovationsin EducationSustainableEconomicsCollaborativeScience Diplomacy

Sub-Field:

4.5.1Multistakeholder Technology Diplomacy

Technology plays a fundamental role in 21st century society, enabling communication, finance, industrial development and much more. But this role requires multistakeholder commitments.
It involves numerous actors in society, from policymakers and grassroots campaigners to technology companies and their customers. These actors often exist in siloed communities. Bringing all these actors together will be increasingly important to map out the future of technology, to set standards and common frameworks and to ensure these technologies embody the societal values we want them to have. A key goal for this kind of diplomacy will be to find ways to balance competition against strategic co-operation. This is important because the potential fragmentation of some of the most important technologies threatens to limit international co-operation and stability.6 For example, the political conflict over Huawei’s 5G infrastructure threatens agreement on standards for 6G and beyond, raising the possibility that China and its allies could take a different technological trajectory in future. The same could happen for gene editing technologies, brain-computer interfaces or climate-altering technologies. Gathering the information and technology nous to tackle these issues and then bringing together the relevant stakeholders to establish global governance frameworks would be key goal for science diplomacy.7

Future Horizons:

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5-yearhorizon

Potential conflict galvanises action

Fragmentation of certain technology standards such as 6G triggers efforts to bring together the multistakeholder groups required to find solutions.

10-yearhorizon

Science diplomacy begins to shape technology platforms

The fruits of multistakeholder technology diplomacy begin to appear in the form of social media platforms that are designed to limit the prevalence of hate messages on topics of race, gender and so on. Ironically, these new technology models increase demand for services that allow anonymous hate messaging.

25-yearhorizon

Multi-stakeholder science diplomacy becomes the norm

Science diplomacy efforts involve actors from city, state and regional governance as well as multinational companies, global science organisations and civic groups.

Multistakeholder Technology Diplomacy - Anticipation Scores

How the experts see this field in terms of the expected time to maturity, transformational effect across science and industries, current state of awareness among stakeholders and its possible impact on people, society and the planet. See methodology for more information.

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