Use the future to build the present
Integrating Non-State Actors
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1Quantum Revolution& Advanced AI2HumanAugmentation3Eco-Regeneration& Geo-Engineering4Science& Diplomacy1.11.21.31.42.12.22.32.43.13.23.33.43.54.14.24.34.44.5HIGHEST ANTICIPATIONPOTENTIALAdvancedArtificial IntelligenceQuantumTechnologiesBrain-inspiredComputingBiologicalComputingCognitiveEnhancementHuman Applications of Genetic EngineeringRadical HealthExtensionConsciousnessAugmentation DecarbonisationWorldSimulationFuture FoodSystemsSpaceResourcesOceanStewardshipComplex Systems forSocial EnhancementScience-basedDiplomacyInnovationsin EducationSustainableEconomicsCollaborativeScience Diplomacy
1Quantum Revolution& Advanced AI2HumanAugmentation3Eco-Regeneration& Geo-Engineering4Science& Diplomacy1.11.21.31.42.12.22.32.43.13.23.33.43.54.14.24.34.44.5HIGHEST ANTICIPATIONPOTENTIALAdvancedArtificial IntelligenceQuantumTechnologiesBrain-inspiredComputingBiologicalComputingCognitiveEnhancementHuman Applications of Genetic EngineeringRadical HealthExtensionConsciousnessAugmentation DecarbonisationWorldSimulationFuture FoodSystemsSpaceResourcesOceanStewardshipComplex Systems forSocial EnhancementScience-basedDiplomacyInnovationsin EducationSustainableEconomicsCollaborativeScience Diplomacy

Sub-Field:

4.5.2Integrating Non-State Actors

The key role that science and technology play in our lives and our futures makes a wide range of non-state actors crucial players in this landscape.
For example, technology companies determine how we communicate and increasingly how these communications should be censored. Pharmaceutical companies decide which diseases to pursue for drug development, while grass-roots organisations such as pressure groups can have a powerful effect on public opinion. And regional and city actors play an increasingly important role in many negotiations.8 Bringing these non-state actors together in a way that gives them an effective voice will be a key part of the process for finding solutions.9 This new generation of actors will require training with the relevant diplomatic skills and with technical knowledge. They will also require forums that bring them together. This kind of capacity building will be a crucial part of next-generation diplomacy.10

Future Horizons:

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5-yearhorizon

Higher education institutions take the lead

Universities and institutes develop courses teaching the unique combinations of multidisciplinary skills for science and technology-related diplomacy. Innovative immersive pairing schemes between politicians, engineers and scientists foster the mutual transfer of skill sets in a broad range of countries.

10-yearhorizon

Non-state actors achieve diplomacy success

Non-state actors begin to play significant roles in preventing fragmentation of technology and the alignment of international technology trajectories.

25-yearhorizon

Trained experts in science diplomacy begin to steer policy

Science and diplomacy-savvy professionals begin to reach positions of influence in their respective careers, fields and countries.

Integrating Non-State Actors - Anticipation Scores

How the experts see this field in terms of the expected time to maturity, transformational effect across science and industries, current state of awareness among stakeholders and its possible impact on people, society and the planet. See methodology for more information.

GESDA Best Reads and Key Resources