Use the future to build the present
Human-centred AI
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1Quantum Revolution& Advanced AI2HumanAugmentation3Eco-Regeneration& Geo-Engineering4Science& Diplomacy1.11.21.31.42.12.22.32.43.13.23.33.43.54.14.24.34.44.5HIGHEST ANTICIPATIONPOTENTIALAdvancedArtificial IntelligenceQuantumTechnologiesBrain-inspiredComputingBiologicalComputingCognitiveEnhancementHuman Applications of Genetic EngineeringRadical HealthExtensionConsciousnessAugmentation DecarbonisationWorldSimulationFuture FoodSystemsSpaceResourcesOceanStewardshipComplex Systems forSocial EnhancementScience-basedDiplomacyInnovationsin EducationSustainableEconomicsCollaborativeScience Diplomacy
1Quantum Revolution& Advanced AI2HumanAugmentation3Eco-Regeneration& Geo-Engineering4Science& Diplomacy1.11.21.31.42.12.22.32.43.13.23.33.43.54.14.24.34.44.5HIGHEST ANTICIPATIONPOTENTIALAdvancedArtificial IntelligenceQuantumTechnologiesBrain-inspiredComputingBiologicalComputingCognitiveEnhancementHuman Applications of Genetic EngineeringRadical HealthExtensionConsciousnessAugmentation DecarbonisationWorldSimulationFuture FoodSystemsSpaceResourcesOceanStewardshipComplex Systems forSocial EnhancementScience-basedDiplomacyInnovationsin EducationSustainableEconomicsCollaborativeScience Diplomacy

Sub-Field:

1.1.2Human-centred AI

The limitations of the machine learning approach to AI mean that powerful AI tends to be hidden in static systems that have to be connected to data centres. However, the goal of many AI developers is to have AI systems embedded in machines that operate dynamically within the human environment.13 This does not require human-level intelligence, but it does require a degree of flexibility and adaptability, and an ability to sense and react to moving objects and changing conditions in the human environment, as well as dexterity and agility in manipulation of objects and human-safe operation.14

This is a significant challenge, but one that could create a new era in our interactions with machines, potentially bringing a sea-change to medical care (especially in an ageing population), industrial production and education, among other areas. It will require advances in sensors, the processing of sensor data, interface design and autonomous decision-making. Researchers anticipate that these kinds of advances will accelerate as the commercial potential for embodied AI begins to be realised.

Future Horizons:

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5-yearhorizon

AI established in dynamic machines

Trials of AI-enabled healthcare robots show potential to assist in dealing with ageing populations. Autonomous vehicles operate with reduced need for human intervention, moving in convoys through interaction with smart road environments. Industrial robots become increasingly safe for deployment in open environments alongside human workers.

10-yearhorizon

AI becomes significantly more flexible and useful

The ability to learn from few data points and to deal with open-ended questions vastly increases the relevance and applicability of AI. This in turns induces an exponential growth of AI knowledge and increases the opportunities for human-machine collaborations, including the augmentation of human capabilities through AI.

25-yearhorizon

AI augments human capabilities

Brain implants coupled to robust, verifiable AI systems accelerate the development of brain-machine interfaces. These are useful in therapeutic settings (e.g., for neuroprosthetics) but also open avenues towards augmenting human abilities. They enable discoveries in neuroscience which bring new insights into human consciousness.

Human-centred AI - Anticipation Scores

How the experts see this field in terms of the expected time to maturity, transformational effect across science and industries, current state of awareness among stakeholders and its possible impact on people, society and the planet. See methodology for more information.

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