Use the future to build the present
Gene-based Diagnostics and Prevention
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1Quantum Revolution& Advanced AI2HumanAugmentation3Eco-Regeneration& Geo-Engineering4Science& Diplomacy1.11.21.31.42.12.22.32.43.13.23.33.43.54.14.24.34.44.5HIGHEST ANTICIPATIONPOTENTIALAdvancedArtificial IntelligenceQuantumTechnologiesBrain-inspiredComputingBiologicalComputingCognitiveEnhancementHuman Applications of Genetic EngineeringRadical HealthExtensionConsciousnessAugmentation DecarbonisationWorldSimulationFuture FoodSystemsSpaceResourcesOceanStewardshipComplex Systems forSocial EnhancementScience-basedDiplomacyInnovationsin EducationSustainableEconomicsCollaborativeScience Diplomacy
1Quantum Revolution& Advanced AI2HumanAugmentation3Eco-Regeneration& Geo-Engineering4Science& Diplomacy1.11.21.31.42.12.22.32.43.13.23.33.43.54.14.24.34.44.5HIGHEST ANTICIPATIONPOTENTIALAdvancedArtificial IntelligenceQuantumTechnologiesBrain-inspiredComputingBiologicalComputingCognitiveEnhancementHuman Applications of Genetic EngineeringRadical HealthExtensionConsciousnessAugmentation DecarbonisationWorldSimulationFuture FoodSystemsSpaceResourcesOceanStewardshipComplex Systems forSocial EnhancementScience-basedDiplomacyInnovationsin EducationSustainableEconomicsCollaborativeScience Diplomacy

Sub-Field:

2.2.1Gene-based Diagnostics and Prevention

Reading and interpreting the genome — whole genome sequencing — has helped to diagnose disease and genetic predispositions to disease. For example, a recent genome-wide meta-analysis linked certain regions of the genome to blood glucose and insulin levels, both of which contribute to the risk of Type 2 diabetes.6 These kinds of advances will help us identify and respond to potential threats to health.
Further advances in diagnostics will also be necessary in order to bring* genome editing into the mainstream. Whole genome sequencing is expensive, slow, and often challenging to interpret. New generations of genome editors require faster, better, and cheaper diagnostics to ensure precision, and to detect and prevent editing errors on the DNA.7 Many of the newer reading/detection methods remain laborious, however. To enable mainstream in vivo editing, these technologies need to be further refined to ensure every laboratory can easily adopt them.

Future Horizons:

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5-yearhorizon

Faster, cheaper, better diagnostics become available

Enhanced DNA sequencing and reading technologies are lower cost, enable wider access, and monitor and increase the safety of genome editors. New generation of diagnostics include CRISPR-based methods are used to detect a variety of targets, including cancer, inherited conditions, viruses and other pathogens.

10-yearhorizon

Reading finds biosecurity applications

Faster sequencing, and better interpretation, are helped by algorithms help trace pieces of DNA to their lab of origin.

25-yearhorizon

Gene reading goes mainstream

Rapid diagnostics enable to-go or home-based devices for detection of complex diseases. Genome sequencing begins to dictate the choices of partners based on genetic compatibility.

Gene-based Diagnostics and Prevention - Anticipation Scores

How the experts see this field in terms of the expected time to maturity, transformational effect across science and industries, current state of awareness among stakeholders and its possible impact on people, society and the planet. See methodology for more information.

GESDA Best Reads and Key Resources