Science & Diplomacy - What Do People Say?
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Science & Diplomacy - What Do People Say?
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Science & Diplomacy - What Do People Say?
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5.5SyntheticBiology5.4Science ofthe Originsof Life5.3FutureEconomics5.2Future ofEducation5.1ComplexSystemsScience4.4Democracy-affirming Technologies4.1Science-basedDiplomacy4.2Advances inScience Diplomacy4.3Digital Technologiesand Conflict3.7InfectiousDiseases3.6Solar RadiationModification3.5OceanStewardship3.4SpaceResources3.3Future FoodSystems3.2WorldSimulation3.1Decarbonisation2.6FutureTherapeutics2.5Organoids2.4ConsciousnessAugmentation2.3RadicalHealthExtension2.2HumanApplicationsof GeneticEngineering2.1CognitiveEnhancement1.6CollectiveIntelligence1.5AugmentedReality1.4BiologicalComputing1.3Brain-inspiredComputing1.2QuantumTechnologies1.1AdvancedAIHIGHEST ANTICIPATIONPOTENTIAL
5.5SyntheticBiology5.4Science ofthe Originsof Life5.3FutureEconomics5.2Future ofEducation5.1ComplexSystemsScience4.4Democracy-affirming Technologies4.1Science-basedDiplomacy4.2Advances inScience Diplomacy4.3Digital Technologiesand Conflict3.7InfectiousDiseases3.6Solar RadiationModification3.5OceanStewardship3.4SpaceResources3.3Future FoodSystems3.2WorldSimulation3.1Decarbonisation2.6FutureTherapeutics2.5Organoids2.4ConsciousnessAugmentation2.3RadicalHealthExtension2.2HumanApplicationsof GeneticEngineering2.1CognitiveEnhancement1.6CollectiveIntelligence1.5AugmentedReality1.4BiologicalComputing1.3Brain-inspiredComputing1.2QuantumTechnologies1.1AdvancedAIHIGHEST ANTICIPATIONPOTENTIAL

Debate 4:

Science & Diplomacy

What Do People Say?

    The scientific fields related to Science and Diplomacy, including innovations in education and sustainable economics for this first phase, showed a strong citizen engagement, with more than 3 million analysed posts. The general discussion was strongly focused on issues related to climate change, according to our 2021 analysis. Science has become increasingly politicised and polarised in some areas due to tensions between the US, China and Russia, a situation that has been exacerbated by COVID-19.

    The citizens discussing this area are comparatively gender-balanced, with female voices overrepresented compared to the general Twitter population, particularly in the northern hemisphere. However, young men are dominating discussions around the implications of technology for conflicts and democracy. Younger age groups (<34 years old) are generally underrepresented in developed areas, whereas they appear to be overrepresented in developing countries.There is a large disparity between the perspectives of very young and old authors, with the very young authors focusing on how technology can be used for democratic purposes, while older generations want to preserve existing democratic processes and appraise technology through that lens.

    This topic is unusual in that it is also comparatively well-balanced geographically, with Africa, Central and South America and Asia accounting for a third of the posts. The main concerns vary significantly across regions. North America’s focus is on security issues with digital democracy; Europe’s is on the further polarisation around, and disregard for, the rule of law; Asia’s is on climate change and extreme weather events; Latin America’s is on economic policy and unemployment; Africa’s is on elitism in democracy and party systems.

    Multilateralism is discussed positively in Africa, Central and South America, Asia and Australia, but not strongly mentioned in North America and Europe. Overall, there are underlying concerns about the future of democracies, and feelings of anxiety around disinformation and cyberattacks by geopolitical entities. However, there is a gap between the sentiment and topics of discussions on social media and what specialists are reporting.

    Within the sentiment analysis clouds below each node represents one article and the linkages between dots show relations between topics in the analysed data.

    Negative sentiment is centered around:

    • The increasing spread of disinformation across news and social media platforms.
    • The need for increased security measures as evidenced by the rising number of cyber attacks worldwide.
    • Extreme weather events such as forest fires and floods, and slowly degrading ecosystems such as the Amazon and the Arctic permafrost.
    • Employment instability and the fear of losing employment as automation increases (concerns that are being amplified by COVID-19 lay-offs).
    • Digital democracy, voter safety, validity and e-voting systems — largely driven by the US elections.

    Neutral/mixed sentiment is centered around:

    Positive sentiment is centered around:

    • Global co-operation of military and researchers and scientists to build up increasingly sophisticated surveillance and cryptologic warfare capabilities.
    • The rise in importance of digital trust for businesses and governments alike, which encourages new initiatives and tools to foster trust.
    • Advances in science diplomacy, primarily regarding the integration of non-state actors in diplomacy through educational programs like the International Model United Nations.
    • Charities focusing on providing education to minority groups and those in need.
    • Innovations in education, specifically in digital, decentralised education and encouraging diversity in access as it relates to gender and sexuality.
    • Sustainable economics, in particular sustainable consumer goods, recyclable materials and plastic-free living.